Friday, April 30, 2021

Poetry Friday: In the style of "Innocence..."

My Poetry Sisters and I are working on writing poems in the style of another poet whose work we love. It's a fun challenge to take a serious look at the structure and elements of something lovely to try and figure out what makes it so. We chose to look at and work from Linda Hogan's poem "Innocence', found here at the Poetry Foundation.

After studying it and talking it over, we noticed the three stanzas focus on discovery, wonder, and growth. The lines of each stanza are 10, 6, and 4. It's a nice progression, don't you think?

I chose to stay with nature, and since I have a pink geranium in my office soaking up the sun, I went back to an experience I had visiting a cemetery and finding geraniums in the trash pile.


Hope

There is nothing more hopeful
than the cast-off geraniums
tossed in the cemetery trash
whose dry roots hold on stubbornly
to the slimmest jolt
of living juice.
Could be the grounds keeper's job
is to keep things tidy by
solemnly sweeping up spent blooms.

Once I dragged out a partially green shoot
from the twisted, wilting pile and
surreptitiously stuck it in my jacket
as I was leaving a funeral,
wondering if one grief
carries over to another

or if one more chance
at life... any life at all
testifies to hope
enough to keep us going.

    - Andromeda Jazmon

Take a look at the poems my Poetry Sisters have written: (Kelly and Laura are taking a break)


and then stop by the Friday Poetry roundup at Radio, Rhythm and Rhyme.

Enjoy!

Friday, January 29, 2021

Merriam Webster’s Time Traveler Poems

2021 and a fresh start to Friday Poetry with my Poetry Sisters! This year we are going to be doing monthly challenges and invite you to join in, if you would like. 

Here’s our plan for next month: To post on Feb 26 (and to share on Twitter as #PoetryPals): roll a set of metaphor dice and write a poem inspired by your metaphor. If you don’t have them, try the online one: https://perchance.org/ve4axzbkx4"


For January, we collected words at the Merriam Webster's Time Traveler site, where you can take a look at a list of the words first used in print during your birth year (or select any year!). I was thinking generational, since I've recently lost my mother and lost my oldest child three years ago. I wondered what progression in language I would parse from comparing our three birth years.


Merriam Webster's Tale of Three Generations


First Generation


Grandma was born

at the moment of truth.

She was no gal Friday.

She was a flat out,

filter tipped,

interfaith

supernova.

She passed on

the genetic markers

of wishful thinking.

She mixed culture shock 

with pablum

and a new deal,

tape recorded our boo boos

and pointed a zoom lens

at Silver Stars.


Second Generation


For instance,

it was happy hour

in the global village

when our virtual memory

reached the tipping point

and queen size

soul sisters

got zonked

on hard rock,

plain vanilla

amuse bouche

and open heart

munchies.

We were brown bagging

no load, nonself picholine

shrink wrapped in

soul music.


Next Generation


Welp.

The third generation

in this story

could be patient zero,

scripting language

and contact tracing

acid wash emoticons.

Their messenger bag

stuffed with off label

steampunk,

they take a deep dive 

into a thirtysomething

minitower.

The FAQ explains

how to gank

paintball GIFs

in virtual reality.

We are all ADHD now.

     - Andromeda Jazmon    2021


Welp, that was a hoot! Check out my Poetry Sister's poems:

Laura

Liz

Sara

Tanita

Tricia

Kelly

And please save some time this weekend to enjoy all the poetry at the round-up at Bookseedstudio!